The author frames the ongoing dispute between British Columbia's teachers and the provincial government as the result of 'shock doctrine' being applied to public education to enable neoliberal 'reform'. He elaborates on the contexts that compelled BC’s teachers into rejecting shock therapy and to mount a full-scale strike, outlines some of the impediments to (re)solving the bargaining impasse between teachers and the provincial government, describes key features of the collective agreement that bridged the impasse between teachers and the provincial government, and highlights some of the tactics that were used to challenge shock therapy and to cultivate shock resistance in BC.