mexblog.jpg Teachers' Demonstration in Mexico There follows an article about the current teachers' strike in Mexico together with a link to a more in depth analysis Teachers in the Mexican state of Morelos have been on strike for more than two months.  The strike seems unusual—it is against the teachers’ own national union, as well as the government.  The national union, the SNTE, is led by Elba Esther Gordillo, who has proclaimed that she will be union president for life.  She has made an agreement with the right wing government that undermines both teachers and public education, calling it the “Alliance for Quality Education” or ACE in its Spanish acronym.The ACE is a plan to privatize and provides for vouchers so that parents can opt out of public educational system and enroll their kids in private schools. It also plans to phase out Normal schools where rural youths are trained as teachers to serve their own communities. Teachers see this part of that plan as aimed at weeding out dissidents who speak up for their communities.Teachers in the opposition democratic movement in several states have been fighting this attack on public education, but none as vigorously as the teachers in Morelos. Since late August, they have shut down not just schools, but also highways and whole cities.The scenario of Oaxaca two years ago seems to be playing out in Morelos now.  An October 14th march drew 40,000 militants to the state capital of Cuernavaca. Bloody confrontations between teachers and their supporters and state and federal police and military have resulted in hundreds of wounded protestors.  The Morelos state union says 240 activists have been arrested in this on-going resistance. Human rights organizations have spoken out against the criminalization of protest that has become a pattern in Mexico as militant teachers have acted to defend public education against not just the state, but also the leadership of their own national union.An extensive report on the situation can be found on the web at http://www.counterpunch.org/ross10232008.html.