Four students, including one 13 year old were last week in Honduras. They were part of mass protests of high school students in the country at the moment, both against the lengthening of the school day and the lack of resources in schools. Lengthening of the school day has serious consequences for low income students who cannot afford private transport in a country where the security situation is so precarious. Between 2010 and 2014, 756 students have been assassinated, including primary school children. As students were on the streets demanding to be heard, they were attacked by police wielding batons and tear gas. 13 students were arrested including seven under 18.

Human rights organisations in the country are clear that the assassinations are an attempt to terrorise the young people to stop their protests. However two days after the murders on the 24th March, the protests were still ongoing according to reports. Students say that they are not just protesting for themselves but for students all over the country and for future generations. They that it would be better to bring desks and teaching materials to schools, than to send in members of the armed military in an attempt to stop the protests. Parents are supporting their children and many intended to keep them at home at the end of the week to keep them safe from attacks by security forces or death squads.

Ever since the illegal coup in 2009, public education, students and  have been in the forefront of the fight for democracy. As a result many have also been assassinated as they fought for public education. Attacks on teachers continue, but as a parent pointed out, attacks on teachers are also an attack on students. Honduras is the most in Latin America and the election of the present incumbent in 2014 has changed nothing, with what some describe as a non-stop war against protesters, low income people and peasants.

University students marched in solidarity with their high school comrades on Friday, in protest against the assassinations.