In the course of the last quarter century, governmental entities in both the United States and England have sought to encourage educational innovation by creating publicly funded schools that are independent from many of the rules that apply to locally controlled schools. These schools are called charter schools in the United States and academy schools (academies) in England. Private companies run a high percentage of these charter schools and academies. In the United States, these companies are commonly referred to as educational management organizations (EMOs). In England, these organizations are called academy trusts (ATs).

This article appears in the Arkansas Law Review, 72,  409 (2019).


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